Assessment schedule abandoned to decrease stress

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Assessment schedule abandoned to decrease stress

Noah Salzberg

Noah Salzberg

Noah Salzberg

Teachers will no longer have to follow the assessment schedule that was implimented two years ago.

By Danny Gordon and Noah Salzberg

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For the 2014-15 school year, CHS administrators opted out of implementing the assessment schedule that was initially formed two years ago.

The assessment schedule allowed certain subjects to test on certain days of the week, with the intention of spreading out tests to reduce student stress.

“I think when [the assessment schedule] was implemented well, the schedule was effective,” assistant principal John Taylor said. “Ever since we implemented the policy, we did mid-year surveys to make sure it was effective, and the results consistently showed no majority. However, the later surveys revealed an overwhelming majority saying that the assessment schedule created more stress.”

In addition to the schedule failing to comply with its original intention, the policy was not consistently followed by teachers, whose lesson plans were disrupted by the assessment schedule.

“We had to plan our weeks around the assessment schedule rather than what was best for the students,” English teacher Christin Nixon said.

According to Mr. Taylor, snow days made the assessment schedule difficult to follow and “impossible to implement.”

Students also found problems with the assessment schedule. It would oftentimes not be clear as to what constituted an assessment. Despite the problems found with the schedule, students have mixed reactions to the elimination of the policy.

“I think it is a harmful decision to the student body that we will have more overlapping assessments,” senior Billy Wang said. “It will give us a lot more unnecessary stress.”

Other students, like junior Zach Ruvo, are pleased with the change.

“I have not been overloaded with tests on the same day, so [the assessment schedule’s removal] hasn’t made a difference to me,” Ruvo said. “The assessment schedule stressed me out because it made school not so much about doing well on tests but rather about getting through the schedule.”

Stress-reduction is a focal point for CHS administrators. Despite the survey’s overwhelmingly negative results the year prior, CHS is still open to the idea of reinstating the assessment schedule.

“We will be conducting a February survey to follow-up on the change in the assessment schedule,” Taylor said. “We would reconsider bringing back the assessment schedule based upon the climate results.”

According to Taylor, CHS administrators are planning to meet with students to evaluate the current assessment schedule and the overall student body’s stress level.

 

Administration implements make-up schedule

According to the CHS administration, to reduce confusion and anxiety, assessment make-ups are now prioritized chronologically by:

1. Date of Absence

2. Period of the Day

For example, if a student is absent on Tuesday and Wednesday, and he misses three tests, he will make them up in the following order:

1. Tuesday 4th Period Science

2. Wednesday 2nd Period Math

3. Wednesday 6th Period History

Students with long term absences must meet with their teachers and counselor to create a makeup schedule.