Get to know the CHS School Resource Officer

Ana Faguy

By Ana Faguy, Production Editor

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Hargrove, a Springbrook alumna, has worked at six MCPS schools.

Hargrove, a Springbrook alumna, has worked at six MCPS schools.

Students may notice a new face at CHS this year; School Resource Officer (SRO) T.N. Hargrove was officially assigned to CHS. The Observer sat down with Officer Hargrove to find out more about her.

Officer Hargrove began her career as a preschool teacher and later decided to become a police officer. She has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Maryland, a certificate in African studies, and a M.S.  in criminal justice from University of Cincinnati.  She has worked at six different schools in MCPS and has been a police officer for nine-and-a-half years.

Q: What is the main task at hand with you being here and what other roles will you have?

A: Mentoring the kids, educating, [giving] presentations, and car and drug safety.

Q: What is the difference between your role and security’s role?

A: Security enforces school policies, my role is law related.

Q: What is your favorite thing about working at CHS?

A: Interacting with the students; it’s totally different than where I came from.

Q: Will there be a greater chance of legal punishment for students?

A: No, it should be the same if I was here or if I wasn’t.

Q: Do you think there is more danger now that the community knows you are here?

A: No, absolutely not. I’ve received a warm welcome from everyone.

Q: Why did you decide to switch from being a preschool teacher to being a police officer?

A: I wanted a change of pace, I wanted to work with adults and kids.

Q: How do you respond to people’s concern about your gun?

A:  Guns are never a toy. My gun only comes out of my holster when I’m going to use it, training or situations that render it necessary.

According to Hargrove, her presence here is to be beneficial to the community, regardless of the apprehension of those in the community.

“I look at everyone here like they’re my kid,” Hargrove said. “I’m the only one here who can protect you against someone with a weapon.”