‘The Fault in our Stars’

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‘The Fault in our Stars’

Fiona Asbury

Fiona Asbury

Fiona Asbury

Sophomore Elaina Faerber counts down the days while rereading The Fault in our Stars in anticipation for the movie.

By Fiona Asbury, Opinions Editor

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As the countdown until summer vacation comes to an end, another countdown reaches its final days; the number of days left until The Fault in our Stars movie is released. The much-anticipated film adaptation of John Green’s best-selling novel is set to premiere June 6, causing much excitement among CHS students.

“I’m really excited to see the movie because I loved the book,” sophomore Sarah Franceski said.

According to Franceski, many of her friends read the book and thought it was emotional and powerful.

Recent book-based films to create this much enthusiasm among teens include action-packed stories such as Divergent and The Hunger Games series. The Fault in our Stars, however, is based not on dystopian adventures.  Instead, it focuses on struggles that hit teens much closer to home. Rather than watching courageous escapes and fight scenes, The Fault in our Stars shows the courage one encounters in everyday life. Hazel Grace Lancaster (Shailene Woodley) and Augustus Waters (Ansel Elgort) valiantly fight a battle against cancer.

“What really inspired me about the book was the fact that the characters were just average people facing issues that real teens face,” sophomore Steven Bae said. “There wasn’t some imaginary world, everything was real.”

According to John Green, the book was loosely based off of the struggles that Esther Earl faced while fighting cancer.

As a result, questions that fans have leading up to other teen movies are irrelevant. Students are not wondering how effectively the movie will portray the imaginary setting of the plot, or whether the CGI effects will live up to what they have imagined because the story takes place right in Indiana.
It does not take a computer to generate the battle between a human and sickness.

The real pressure will be on the actors, Woodley and Elgort, to recreate the unique characters and their quirky personalities, since the characters and story are what have drawn readers in.

“I haven’t seen either of the actors in a movie before, but I really hope they make the movie as good as the book,” Bae said.

Even students who have not read the book or did not find it to be particularly good are still looking forward to see the movie.

“I thought the book was overrated, but I’m still going to see it,” junior Isabella Wu said.

Going to see the movie will be a great way for students to take a break from studying for exams and kick start their summer vacation.