SGA canned food drive falls short of expectations

By Elizabeth Campbell, Editor-in-Chief

The SGA-sponsored canned food drive for Manna Food Bank, which lasted from Oct. 14 to Nov. 1, resulted in fewer cans than expected but SGA leaders remain hopeful for future events.

The advertisements the SGA broadcasted on the Daily Dose for the drive ended with the statistic that, if every CHS student and staff member brought in at least three cans, the school could donate more than 6,000 cans.

“Unfortunately, we did not reach our goal this year for the canned food drive,” SGA president Carly Raizon said.

In the past few years, CHS averaged over 5,000 cans with a record high of mid -7,000.

Junior Stasia Mculsky was one of the few who did bring in cans to her first period.

“We have so much; it’s not hard to bring in a couple cans,” Mculsky said. “I’m not sure why people didn’t. It’s so easy.”

Sophomore Michael Laychie felt the drive was not publicized enough, and was not even aware there was one.

Raizon admits that there were some issues with publicizing the event, as the only advertising was done on the Daily Dose.

“We should have done more advertising to get the word out, and now we know better for next time,” Raizon said.

Current SGA sponsor Daniel Lethbridge agrees and is optimistic for future years.

“We will have to market better in the future,” Lethbridge said. “With advanced planning next year it will improve.”

Former SGA sponsor Matthew Schilling believes that timing and a lack of adequate publicity were leading causes behind the lack of cans.

“First period doesn’t work very well,” Schilling said. “You have to get teachers to buy in, and I don’t think first period does that; it’s too early in the morning. If you do it fourth period, it’s a little easier for people to bring stuff in.”

While the SGA has no current plans for another can drive, some feel it could be more effective next time around.

According to Schilling, another drive could be a good idea, especially one near winter break, when many families who rely on free and reduced price lunches struggle the most.

Despite the disappointment, Raizon remains hopeful.

“I am planning many more school events and hope to see the CHS community get more involved in future events,” Raizon said.